County commission files suit against opioid manufacturers, distributors

EDITOR’S NOTE: The LaPorte County Commission has officially joined a number of other Indiana counties and cities in filing a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers as one strategy in fighting the opioid epidemic. This press release was issued by the commission’s attorneys, Cohen & Malad, LLP of Indianapolis:

LaPorte County has now filed a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers and distributors for causing the opioid addiction crisis that has devastated the community and depleted resources from the county. LaPorte County drug overdose deaths were up almost 60% in 2017.

The manufacturer defendants are Purdue Pharma, Cephalon, Inc., Teva Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Noramco, Inc., Endo Pharmaceuticals, Mallinckrodt PLC, Allergan PLC, and Watson Pharmaceuticals. The lawsuit alleges these manufacturers deceptively marketed the appropriate uses, risks, and safety of opioids.

The opioid distributor defendants are AmerisourceBergen Drug Corporation, Cardinal Health, Inc., and McKesson Corporation. The lawsuit alleges these distributors failed in their duty to report and stop suspicious orders of opioids that flooded LaPorte County, which has had as high as 128 opioid prescriptions per 100 people in the county.  

LaPorte County Commission President Rich Mrozinski credited his fellow commissioner, Dr. Vidya Kora, with bringing the need for suit to the commission’s attention. Mrozinski added that, “with so many of my fellow veterans that I work with, I see the terrible damage that has been inflicted by this opioid epidemic. I know all three of us on the county commission feel good that we are doing something to try to recover the costs on law enforcement, EMS and other county agencies as we all struggle to deal with the impact this is having and provide resources for prevention and treatment going forward.”

“LaPorte County leaders have actively sought solutions to stop the opioid addiction crisis on the county’s doorstep and recoup resources to help the community. This lawsuit seeks to hold opioid manufacturers and distributors accountable for their roles in creating this horrible epidemic and to put the county on the path to recovery,” said Lynn Toops of the Indianapolis law firm of Cohen & Malad, LLP.

18 Responses to “County commission files suit against opioid manufacturers, distributors”

  1. ILUVLP

    Mar 08. 2018

    Thanks for stepping up against this horrible epidemic.
    Something needs to be done.

    Reply to this comment
  2. Taxpayer

    Mar 08. 2018

    This is stupid !! Its not the drug companies fault. Its the scum that dont have enough brains not to use this junk. Im fat can I sue the fork ??

    Reply to this comment
    • Name (required)

      Mar 09. 2018

      If a person is fat, a doctor didn’t prescribe a Big Mac to make him think it would make him feel better. A person wouldn’t have to endure weeks of crippling withdrawals and mental effects if he/she stopped shoving his/her face with garbage every day. All they’d have to do is put the fork down. An addiction to opioids is vastly different, and as you seem to know nothing about it, it would be preferable for you to not comment on the topic. If you don’t have something nice to say don’t say anything at all

      Reply to this comment
    • Name (required)

      Mar 09. 2018

      And yes, you are wrong. The drug companies are 100% at fault and if you can’t really see that then there is no point in even attempting to reason with you or your anger

      Reply to this comment
  3. WWJD

    Mar 09. 2018

    i pray the Holy Spirit will come into your heart

    Reply to this comment
  4. bob

    Mar 09. 2018

    mark my words , the attorneys are the only ones that will benefit . You had to been there when the attorneys gave their talk on why Laporte county should join other counties in this suit . mark my words

    Reply to this comment
  5. Big DADDY

    Mar 09. 2018

    If anyone wants to sue anyone over all the drugs, they should start out suing the television stations for all those drug ads. Those ads don’t do anymore than promote more drugs. You don’t go to the doctor and tell him you need this pill or that pill. The doctor tells you what pill you need. So, why advertise drugs on television?

    Reply to this comment
  6. lawman

    Mar 09. 2018

    Americas answer to everything-the lawsuit. taxpayer is right-.america has an obesity epidemic too-but fast food and sugared drinks continue to be consumed-legally.

    Reply to this comment
    • disgusted

      Mar 11. 2018

      Until people take personal responsibility, things will NOT get better. It seems to be an epidemic in our world today to blame others. Perhaps taking personal responsibility and dealing with mental illness may be a better place to start. I am a terminally ill cancer patient and need these drugs, shame on any of you that think it’s okay to make life even harder than it is on people like myself!

      Reply to this comment
  7. Somebody who knows

    Mar 09. 2018

    @taxpayer:
    I am a taxpaying man also. In 2008 I had chronic kidney stones and have suffered irreversible back injuries. I was prescribed pain killers by my family doctor. I have now been taking them for over 10 years. I’m not a junkie, and I possess enormous amounts of “common sense” (something that you don’t seem to exhibit; calling people “scum” that you don’t even know (and clearly have no real knowledge of what the REAL underlying cause of the epidemic is.
    I’ve seen your ignorant and rash posts about flunkies and junkie constantyl, and decided to speak up, because it is ignorance such as yours that does nothing to aid the problem or help to find an alternative strategy. Your “hate speech” is counter productive, and frankly reminds me of something a child in my kids elementary school might say.
    The opioid crisis isn’t the fault of the people taking the drugs. The drugs are being prescribed by people they trust (doctors) who in turn are being pressured and paid by pharmaceutical reps.
    The people taking he drugs feel they are safe ( seeing as they come from a doctor) and because of the bodies tolerance and the fact that opioids are HIGHLY addictive it cause a downward spiral of addiction that many people can’t get out of (similar to overwhelming debt)
    Your comments are misguided, and counter productive.
    I feel as if I waste my time here, because judging by your personality you lack critical introspection to recognize when you’re wrong. But that’s me “judging” you as much as you may be “judging” a person like me, so I’ll quick with the insults.
    Think before you speak and toss around slanderous words. Calling other people scum to make yourself seem above people is not helpful to anyone.
    Between you, “lawman” and “judge bean” I am slowly losing faith in this communities ability to rationally, peaceably and effectively make any progress that doesn’t include name calling and hatred.
    The mirror in your house is your best friend “lawman”. Take a look into it, and think long and hard about what YOU might be a prisoner to in your life. Then question whose fault it is.
    Then, next time you decided to tap your thumbs out with some ignorant slur about people (people that you are blatantly kicking when they’re already down) take a step back, out your phone away and realize nobody wants to hear your angry garbage. There’s far too much of that in this country as it is

    Reply to this comment
    • Judge Roy Bean

      Mar 10. 2018

      “Somebody”- When I refer to the drug dealers, child molesters, and rapists as “scum”, it’s because they are. If I could use a harsher word I would. I feel that scum is more fitting than perhaps “misguided soles”. I’m sorry it may offend you and may not be politically correct, but we all have our own opinions.

      Reply to this comment
      • Somebody

        Mar 10. 2018

        Bean: it isn’t about being P.C.
        You can call drug dealers scum all day long if you want. Taxpayers comment referred to people addicted to drugs as scum, and said that it was their fault for not having common sense.
        That in itself is an ignorant comment. Perhaps not made by YOU, so maybe you shouldn’t have been dragged into it.

        Reply to this comment
        • Judge Roy Bean

          Mar 10. 2018

          Thank you. I was wondering why you called me out on this article when I hadn’t even commented. No harm.

          Reply to this comment
  8. lawman

    Mar 10. 2018

    wow ‘somebody”-you need mental counseling much more than you realize. this is an open forum and your ranting seems a bit out of place as others have opinions also

    Reply to this comment
    • Somebody

      Mar 10. 2018

      Lawman: you’re correct, this is an open forum. MY opinion is that you, judge bean, and taxpayer are constantly bad mouthing people on this site. Go ahead and talk down to drug dealers, rapists..you’re 100% correct those people should be admonished by society. But to blame the USERS of drugs and say that they are “scum” that don’t have common sense, that in itself speaks of a lack of common sense.
      Mental health issues? I’ll address that by saying this: your comment to me ( somebody you don’t know) as an attempt to cut me down (without having any idea whether I have “mental health issues) or not speaks volumes of what’s wrong with this country. Instant anger, and instant bashing and condemnation rather than admitting when wrong.
      The USERS of drugs are not “scum”. They don’t lack “common sense”. You’d be surprised. Your teachers, your politicians, your firefighters…many people are crippled by opioids that you wouldn’t even be able to tell. They aren’t all ghoulish pieces of garbage weighing society down. This epidemic stretches into suburbia and beyond.

      Reply to this comment
      • Judge Roy Bean

        Mar 10. 2018

        “Somebody”, again you have me wrong. I don’t call drug users scum. I do call drug dealers, child molesters, and rapists scum, because they are. As far as drug users I do not throw stones. I too was a heavy drug user in LP back in the 70’s when cocaine was all the rage. I started hanging out with the wrong crowd and simple marijuana use led to one drug after another. The low point of my life was when I started using needles and almost overdosing. I didnt have the nerve to use the needle on my own so the dealer administed the cocaine. I was fortunate enough to be able to move away and get away from the drugs and the crowd I was hanging around.
        Today’s drug use is far worse than my era. As you mention, its all sorts of people from all sorts of backgrounds that are hooked, not just people down and out. Drugs are given out by doctors like candy, and are too easily accessible.
        Like Big Daddy mentions above, there are way too many prescription drug commercials on television today. Thats all you see. Take this drug, take that drug, etc. Not good.
        I am very thankful I have grown kids that never got hooked on drugs.
        I can only hope that others that are hooked on drugs seek help, and the drug task force keeps busting these drug dealers. Its a start.

        Reply to this comment
    • somebody

      Mar 10. 2018

      To continue with your agreement to “taxpayer” do you honestly think fast food and obesity is an equitable analogy for the opioid crisis?
      If a person decides to change their life and not eat at McDonald’s, will they have to endure weeks of withdrawals and months of mental rehab? Would they find themselves unable to work, play with the kids , or even function without a cheeseburger? Did a doctor prescribe the cheeseburger to them in the first place, making them think that it was safe to consume?

      Reply to this comment
  9. lawman

    Mar 10. 2018

    somebody sounds like a person who blames ”somebody else” for his(her) problems-common in todays world. and yes-obesity is an equitable analogy. it has affected our insurance policies and life expectancies

    Reply to this comment

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