LaPorte man, Chicago man recently convicted of dealing drugs

Press release provided

Dilley

The LaPorte County Drug Task Force and The LaPorte County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office announce the conviction of two defendants in separate investigations conducted by the drug task force. Both of the defendants have previous convictions for dealing narcotics.

The first defendant, Kyle S. Dilley, 28, of LaPorte, was tried by a jury in LaPorte County Superior Court 1, where he was found to be guilty on Aug. 14, 2018, of Dealing in Methamphetamine Level 2 Felony, and Possession of a Narcotic Drug Level 5 Felony. The case was tried by Deputy Prosecutor Elizabeth Boehm and assisted by lead detectives Cpl. Cisco Rodriguez, and Detective Kyle Shiparski. Dilley remains incarcerated in the LaPorte County Jail, where he awaits sentencing on Sept. 27. He faces a sentence of 10-30 years.

Lowery

The second defendant, Calvin L. Lowery, 29, of Chicago, was tried by a jury in LaPorte County Superior Court 1, where he was found guilty on Sept. 11, 2018, of Dealing in a Narcotic Drug (Heroin) Level 4 Felony. The case was tried by Deputy Prosecutor Elizabeth Boehm and assisted by lead detectives Sgt. Andy Hynek, and Cpl. Cisco Rodriguez. Lowery remains incarcerated in the LaPorte County Jail, where he awaits sentencing in October. He faces a sentence of 2-12 years.

“My office and the Drug Task Force have been working hand-in-hand to interrupt the flow and distribution of heroin and other controlled substances in LaPorte County,” said Prosecuting Attorney John Espar said in a press release. “We will continue the effort to put dangerous dealers behind bars while educating the public on the dangers of opioids and pursuing a comprehensive community-based approach to this national crisis. I appreciate the hard work of the dedicated task force officers and my staff who brought these defendants to justice.”

8 Responses to “LaPorte man, Chicago man recently convicted of dealing drugs”

  1. lawman

    Sep 12. 2018

    previous convictions should equal max sentences. too many times courts lenient. 30 and 12

    Reply to this comment
  2. Oldeskule

    Sep 13. 2018

    Our judicial system in this county is so screwed up. We have judges who seemingly are afraid to sentence anyone to anything but work release or probation.

    Can’t do the time? Don’t do the crime

    Reply to this comment
  3. Judge Roy Bean

    Sep 13. 2018

    Unless these dealers start being made an example of, it’s never going to get better. The amount of time given to these guys is a joke. They sure as heck don’t take it seriously. How about LIFE in prison? Then maybe some of them may wise up. If I had my way they would get the opposite of life, just so we don’t waste prison space and taxpayers money. It’s getting WAY out of control, and not just LP.

    Reply to this comment
  4. lawman

    Sep 13. 2018

    yes-you always here of sentences being lessened in plea deals etc-WELL THIS IS A DONE DEAL!. all that is left is the sentencing-and remember-they will serve less that half. I say again 30 and 12-cmon judge!

    Reply to this comment
  5. Disquisted

    Sep 14. 2018

    I, myself, am sick and tired of hearing about all the overdoses, the narcan uses, and waste of taxpayers money and time, on these low life, scumbag, waste of space ppl. Get them the hell off our streets, away from society, and keep them in the system. 30 days incarcerated, and then the chair! BOOM!! B done. No second, third, fourth, fifth or 20th time!! SOOO done with with these people.

    Reply to this comment
  6. al

    Sep 14. 2018

    Want to bet on the length of sentences? CHICKEN judges.

    Reply to this comment
  7. Anon

    Sep 15. 2018

    This is a death sentence compared to what they’d receive in Chicago. Until liberal Illinois fixes their justice system, La Porte will continue to suffer. If you think this is bad, just wait a decade. La Porte will be uninhabitable for law abiding citizens.

    Reply to this comment
  8. wanaspk2

    Sep 19. 2018

    The police departments are doing a great job getting these dealers off the street. But now my question is where do you put all of them? The space to hold all of them is limited. Maybe the State should build more prisons. Maybe that is why the sentence given is short, can’t stay too long in prison because there are more coming, more waiting trial so they have to make room.

    Reply to this comment

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