Temple News Agency closes; there’s talk of pending sale

Here’s what the owners of Temple News Agency posted on the business’s Facebook page: “Well folks, this is it. Temple News Agency will officially be closing the doors forever on Saturday, 4/27. For those of you who have supported us, thank you for everything and you’re all amazing. We had a good run. We had a good time. We made some memories.”

The owners initially posted news of an everything-goes sale on the 27th, then canceled it, offering news of a possible pending sale of the business: “Great news! Sale is pending — Temple News will likely have a new owner by the end of this weekend and will reopen soon. Stay tuned for details.”

Temple News Agency’s century-old legacy has most recently been in the hands of owners J.D. and Jennifer Flynn, who took the helm in late 2018.

Temple is so named because it’s part of the stately Masonic Temple building on Jefferson Avenue in downtown LaPorte. Over its amazing 100-year run, it has boasted a vintage soda fountain, the latest in comic books, newspapers fresh off the press, magazines, great coffee and other refreshments, and local entertainment.

For more information, visit https://www.facebook.com/Temple.News.Agency/ and www.templenewsagency.com. The latter includes more on the store’s history.

9 Responses to “Temple News Agency closes; there’s talk of pending sale”

  1. Lynn Lisarelli

    Apr 28. 2019

    Nothing, nothing, but NOTHING lasts in this town. Can’t count on anything anymore. What a doggoned shame.

    Reply to this comment
  2. Bomob

    Apr 28. 2019

    I hope they get new owners. The kids and I love the place. After our first visit this year with the new owners we swore off going back. The customer service was aweful, and down right rude before we even made our ice cream choices. We would love to come back and support ANY NEW ownerahip!!!!

    Reply to this comment
  3. Bob

    Apr 28. 2019

    Oh no! Where will La Porte’s hipster population gather now?

    Reply to this comment
    • Tom

      Apr 29. 2019

      I know right. lol. When I went in there a couple of weeks back trying to enjoy my coffee was the worker complaining about the owners and everything else.

      Reply to this comment
  4. Papadoc

    Apr 28. 2019

    To Lynn, the Temple News Agency predates you and in all likelihood will survive under the right new ownership. But you are correct, nothing last forever. Does anyone know who had it prior to Esther Flickinger? Many owners since, but with the exception of Mike Sitar, no one had as long of a run. I hope that it rises from the dust and becomes viable again

    Reply to this comment
  5. Dr. Alva R. Miller

    Apr 28. 2019

    The Flickingers stood up with my folks at their wedding in 1929, and I was born in 1930. We lived above Cutler’s Funeral Home where Swawnson’s Insurance is now. That block was my playground, and from the time I could ride a tricycle,I visited everyone on that block. Esther always gave me an ice cream cone, as did the police where the Masonic Lodge is now. My mom placed a sign on my back which said “Please don’t feed me”, so from then on I always came home with pockets full of nickels. Sad to see it go (if it does). I believe Don bought it for Esther about the year I was born.

    Reply to this comment
  6. lawman

    Apr 28. 2019

    really hard to make all the payments with what little they have to offer. people purchase a 2-3 dollar item and sit for 2 hrs. can’t make rent payments that way. many local coffee shops, ice cream parlors etc are vanishing around the country with the advent of fast paced profit oriented society.

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  7. Debra Birkholz

    Apr 29. 2019

    The Flickinger family bought the Temple News Ageny for their son Wilbur in 1929. Wilbur didn’t like being tied down so he turned it over to his sister Esther who ran it for many years.

    Reply to this comment
  8. Beth

    Apr 30. 2019

    Dr. Miller, I love your story. Thank you for sharing that. I could listen to people tell stories like this about how and where they grew up all day. It’s a shame current and future generations will never know the freedom and innocence of growing up like that.

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