Moments in Time … in photographs

The original La Porte Dairy Queen, located on Madison Street just north of the railroad tracks, was a very popular destination for many La Porteans. As kids then will well remember, Mr. Schoof gave away many free cones.

Frank Pease (right) poses with his truck for his well business, which was located at 1402 Jefferson Ave. Mr. Pease became a well-known photographer in La Porte. His offices were located above the former B&J’s Café at 607 Lincoln Way. Pease’s photos became the basis for the book and documentary, “La Porte, Indiana,” by Jason Bitner, who described Pease as an “accidental historian.”

Candy stripers are pictured here circa 1960. Candy stripers were hospital volunteers who worked in a variety of healthcare settings under the direct supervision of nurses or nuns. The term “candy striper” is derived from the red-and-white striped pinafores that the female volunteers traditionally wore.

7 Responses to “Moments in Time … in photographs”

  1. Charlie Maslankowski

    Nov 22. 2020

    What a great memory from my childhood! Used to ride my bike there and listen and watch the trains roll through that crossing. As kids, we had our choices of DQ, Tasty Freeze, Sages and Lenick’s for their sweet favorites.🤩😋👅

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    • ILUVLP

      Nov 22. 2020

      Charlie,
      We must have grown up in the same era. We never wanted for a good ice cream spot. Great times when you could actual enjoy your childhood adventures throughout the town an be safe. I must say Sages was my favorite because of the wide variety of ice creams, sherbets, and candy available.

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  2. lawman

    Nov 22. 2020

    ILUVLP sages was best ice cream in town!! but owners we not very nice. my friend went to comb his hair in there and they ran him out-didn’t want hair all over the place-wow. yes-fun memories

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    • ILUVLP

      Nov 22. 2020

      Lawman,
      That is hilarious. LOL. I can still remember the lady owners face giving us kids the evil eye as we picked out penny candies. Having to slide the display case door back an forth as we made our selections.
      I would love to see photos of the inside of Sage’s from back in the day.
      I was lucky enough to score an old “Sage’s” bottle on Ebay many years ago.

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  3. Bev Warfield

    Nov 22. 2020

    I was fortunate to work for Bob Schoof at that Dairy Queen for three years. Mr.Schoof was my bus driver at Kingsbury High School, as well. He was such a kind and giving person. Yes, he would give away many, many cones.
    Before the overpass, many cars were stopped at that railroad crossing on busy Madison Street. When some would get stopped for a long freight train, they would run up to buy treats from the Dairy Queen.
    Back then (in those days), we would make all the dilly bars, ice cream sandwiches, and drumstick cones right there at the store. It was fun and a pleasure working for Bob Schoof. Thanks for bringing back the memories of that Dairy Queen and Mr. Schoof.
    Later, he owned Schoof’s Bicycle Store in La Porte.

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  4. Mike K

    Nov 22. 2020

    All great shots!! Would love to see how many of the ladies can be identified in the candy striper photo!

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  5. David Long

    Nov 22. 2020

    In the summer of 1958, my Dad moved us from Hobart, IN to 305 Perry St., behind the Dairy Queen. I was 6 years and thought I’d died and gone to heaven. By 1962, we moved to the other side of the block to 6 Pine Lake Ave., right next door to the DQ. Mr. Schoof would hire the neighborhood kids to shovel snow if need be in March when he opened and sweep the parking lot and pull weeds in the summer. He was a great human being.

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